logo

In the News

<div>'Impossible To Save': Scientists Are Watching China's Glaciers Disappear</div>
Xinjiang has nearly 20,000 glaciers, half of China's total. They're all receding at a record pace — and will continue to melt, some scientists warn, even if global temperatures stop rising.
Read more...
The place spacecraft go to die
Why one of the Earth's most remote places is the preferred place to dump space junk.
Read more...
Troubled By Flint Water Crisis, 11-Year-Old Girl Invents Lead-Detecting Device
The Colorado seventh-grader was unimpressed by the options her parents had to test water in their home. So she created a sensor-based device using chemically treated carbon nanotubes to do it faster.
Read more...
Global CO2 Emissions Stalled for the Third Year in a Row
The annual assessment of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by the JRC and the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL) confirms that CO2 emissions have stalled for the third year in a row.
Read more...
NASA Sees a New Depression Form After Another Fizzled
The Northwestern Pacific Ocean generated another tropical depression hours after a different system quickly faded. NASA’s Aqua satellite provided a look at Tropical Depression 27W after it developed about 300 miles from Chuuk. Earlier in the day, Tropical Depression 26W dissipated in the South China Sea.
Read more...
Cool Roofs Have Water Saving Benefits Too
The energy and climate benefits of cool roofs have been well established: By reflecting rather than absorbing the sun’s energy, light-colored roofs keep buildings, cities, and even the entire planet cooler. Now a new study by the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has found that cool roofs can also save water by reducing how much is needed for urban irrigation.
Read more...
NOAA, NASA team up again to investigate the atmosphere over Antarctica
Thirty years after NASA and NOAA launched a groundbreaking airborne campaign to study the Antarctic ozone hole, the two federal science agencies have once again joined forces over the world’s highest, driest and coldest continent to sniff out the secrets of the atmosphere.On Oct. 14, NASA’s heavily instrumented DC-8 flew over Antarctica as part of the Atmospheric Tomography Mission or ATom, an unprecedented effort to sample the remote atmosphere to understand the distribution of man-made pollutants and short-lived greenhouse gases.
Read more...
Do You Care If Your Fish Dinner Was Raised Humanely? Animal Advocates Say You Should
Concerns over animal welfare have led to changes in recent years in how livestock are raised. But seafood has been missing from the conversation. One group aims to change that.
Read more...
Report: Pollution Kills 3 Times More than AIDS, TB And Malaria Combined
Researchers looked at the combined effects of air, water and soil pollution on global health to come up with an annual toll.
Read more...
A New Butterflyfish— A Rare, Surprise Find— Is Described from the Philippine “Twilight Zone” and Academy Exhibit
A newly described species of brown-and-white Philippine butterflyfish—the charismatic Roa rumsfeldi—made a fantastic, 7,000-mile journey before surprising scientists with its unknown status. Live specimens collected from 360 feet beneath the ocean’s surface in the Philippine’s Verde Island Passage escaped special notice until a single black fin spine tipped off aquarium biologists back in San Francisco. Deep-diving researchers from the California Academy of Sciences’ Hope for Reefs team—with genetic sequencing help from a parent–son team—share their discovery of a fifth species of Roa this week in ZooKeys.
Read more...
Carbon Feedback from Forest Soils will Accelerate Global Warming, 26-Year Study Projects
After 26 years, the world’s longest-running experiment to discover how warming temperatures affect forest soils has revealed a surprising, cyclical response: Soil warming stimulates periods of abundant carbon release from the soil to the atmosphere alternating with periods of no detectable loss in soil carbon stores. Overall, the results indicate that in a warming world, a self-reinforcing and perhaps uncontrollable carbon feedback will occur between forest soils and the climate system, adding to the build-up of atmospheric carbon dioxide caused by burning fossil fuels and accelerating global warming. The study, led by Jerry Melillo, Distinguished Scientist at the Marine Biological Laboratory(MBL), appears...
Read more...
<div>A brief history of the Earth's CO2</div>
Prof Joanna Haigh from Imperial College London explains why this gas has played a crucial role in shaping the Earth's climate.
Read more...
Alarm over decline in flying insects
Flying insects have declined by more than 75% in 30 years in German nature reserves, alarming ecologists.
Read more...
<div>Stonehenge builders 'ate food from Scotland'</div>
Animals were transported from as far away as the north east of Scotland to the Neolithic site in Wiltshire.
Read more...
How Fire Forensics Investigators Approach The Aftermath Of Wildfires
NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Fire Captain Specialist Ron Eldridge of Cal Fire about fire forensics and what approaches investigators take when they're faced with many miles of scorched earth, like the situation in northern California now.
Read more...
<div>Invasive 'Devil Fish' Plague Mexico's Waters. Can't Beat 'Em? Eat 'Em</div>
The armored catfish erodes shorelines and devastates marine plants — and its numbers have exploded. So researchers, chefs and fishermen are trying to rebrand it by promoting its flavor and nutrition.
Read more...
Photo of butchered rhino wins top award
A shocking image of a dehorned black rhino makes Brent Stirton Wildlife Photographer of the Year.
Read more...
<div>'Big, bad wolf' image flawed - scientists</div>
New research casts doubt on the idea that dogs are naturally more tolerant and friendly than wolves.
Read more...
Breaking: E.P.A. announces repeal of major Obama-era emissions rule.
The Trump administration announced Monday that it would take formal steps to repeal President Barack Obama’s signature policy to curb greenhouse gas emissions from power plants.
Read more...
<div>Essen's experiment: Can going green revive a post-industrial economy?</div>
Will green tourism be profitable enough for a German city to regain its former economic strength?
Read more...
Scottish government bans fracking after public opposition.
The Scottish government has banned fracking after a consultation found overwhelming public opposition and little economic justification for the industry.
Read more...
Desperation grows in Puerto Rico’s poor communities without water or power.
The health crisis is intensifying two weeks after Hurricane Maria, and government aid is slow. 'We could see significant epidemics,' a health expert warned.
Read more...
Climate change creating food shortages across the Pacific, says support agency.
Food shortages and eroding coastlines are an increasingly urgent problem across the Pacific, thanks to climate change.
Read more...
Protection for tiny darter contrasts admin moves on grizzlies.
Some tiny Southern fish and the lumbering grizzly bear are dramatizing divergent sides of the debate over adding and removing animals from Endangered Species Act protections.
Read more...