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La Paz adapts to a world without water.
The Bolivian city is high and dry after losing its glaciers.
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Thousands of spills at US oil and gas fracking sites
Up to 16% of hydraulically fractured oil and gas wells spill liquids each year, according to new data.
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Lemur facial recognition tool developed
A method that can identify individual lemurs could improve the way the endangered species is tracked.
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<div>Pruitt questions agency's authority to regulate carbon.</div>
U.S. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt is questioning whether his agency is empowered to regulate greenhouse gas emissions.
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How an interoffice spat erupted into a climate-change furor.
Retired government scientist John Bates has emerged as a hero to some conservative media outlets and politicians, and among climate-change deniers on Facebook and Twitter.
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Small ponds have big impact on global warming: Study.
Tiny natural ponds pose an overlooked danger for speeding up global warming, according to a study published in the journal Nature Climate Change.
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The nuclear engineer who is the darling of the alt-energy world.
Dr. Rachel Slaybaugh is quickly becoming one of the most well-known names in nuclear energy — and she’s only 32.
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The age of the giant battery is almost upon us.
The idea that giant batteries may someday revolutionize electrical grids has long enthralled clean-power advocates and environmentalists. Now it’s attracting bankers with the money to make it happen.
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Hospital saves dehydrated baby hippo at Cincinnati Zoo
Cincinnati Zoo's premature baby hippo Fiona needed urgent treatment for dehydration.
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What future for E numbers after Brexit?
How Brexit might create complications for the way food in the UK is labelled.
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Slippery bottle solves ketchup problem
Scientists in Boston have found a way to get every last drop of ketchup out of the bottle.
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<div>New Research Shows How 'Atmospheric Rivers' Wreak Havoc Around The Globe</div>
The idea of plumes of moisture curling above our heads might seem beautiful, but new research shows atmospheric rivers to be among the most damaging of weather systems.
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<div>The Burning Problem Of China's Garbage</div>
China produces 520,000 tons of garbage a day. To get rid of it, the government favors burning it, which harms the environment. One answer: sorting garbage and recycling. But that's proved challenging.
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Scientists Use Flying Laboratory To Track Greenhouse Gases
A team of scientists is flying the globe to track greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. We join a crew over the Arctic as they measure things they say computer models could never pick up.
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Lead Ammunition Poisons Wildlife But Too Expensive To Change, Hunters Say
Just before leaving office, the Obama administration banned the use of lead ammunition on federal land. Some hunters want President Trump to reverse the ban.
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Environmentalists and libertarians unite in HS2 criticism
Friends of the Earth and Taxpayers' Alliance are normally at odds on policy, but both criticise HS2
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When Their Food Ran Out, These Reindeer Kept Digging
Reindeer are thought to face a grim future as climate change threatens lichen, a key winter food source. But on one Alaskan island, reindeer have found a new food source, making scientists hopeful.
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In Massachusetts, Coastal Residents Consider How To Adapt To Climate Change
Living by the shore in the age of climate change means managing risk. In the community of Nahant, Mass., residents are trying to decide how to adapt.
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NIST Quest for Climate-Friendly Refrigerants Finds Complicated Choices
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have just completed a multiyear study to identify the “best” candidates for future use as air conditioning refrigerants that will have the lowest impact on the climate.Unfortunately, all 27 fluids NIST identified as the best from a performance viewpoint are at least slightly flammable, which is not allowed under U.S. safety codes for most end uses. Several fluids among the list of refrigerants are highly flammable, including propane, the fuel for outdoor grills.
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How untreated water is making our kids sick
A Florida State University researcher has drawn a link between the impact of climate change and untreated drinking water on the rate of gastrointestinal illness in children.
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Less snow and a shorter ski season in the Alps
After long-awaited snowfall in January, parts of the Alps are now covered with fresh powder and happy skiers. But the Swiss side of the iconic mountain range had the driest December since record-keeping began over 150 years ago, and 2016 was the third year in a row with scarce snow over the Christmas period. A study published today in The Cryosphere, a journal of the European Geosciences Union, shows bare Alpine slopes could be a much more common sight in the future.
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Antarctic sea ice extent lowest on record
This year the extent of summer sea ice in the Antarctic is the lowest on record. The Antarctic sea ice minimum marks the day – typically towards end of February – when sea ice reaches its smallest extent at the end of the summer melt season, before expanding again as the winter sets in.
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<div>Snow Science in Support of Our Nation&#39;s Water Supply</div>
Researchers have completed the first flights of a NASA-led field campaign that is targeting one of the biggest gaps in scientists' understanding of Earth's water resources: snow.NASA uses the vantage point of space to study all aspects of Earth as an interconnected system. But there remain significant obstacles to measuring accurately how much water is stored across the planet's snow-covered regions. The amount of water in snow plays a major role in water availability for drinking water, agriculture and hydropower.
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How an Ice Age paradox could inform sea level rise predictions
New findings from the University of Michigan explain an Ice Age paradox and add to the mounting evidence that climate change could bring higher seas than most models predict.The study, published in Nature, shows how small spikes in the temperature of the ocean, rather than the air, likely drove the rapid disintegration cycles of the expansive ice sheet that once covered much of North America.
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<div>At the Women's March, a call for climate protection, too.</div>
Amid a sea of signs and pink hats, plenty of people also marched for environment and climate science.
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Alaska Natives to protect land for California carbon program.
An undeveloped Alaska coal field, California's offsets for carbon pollution and thousands of acres of forest are the unlikely players in a complex agreement that is expected to generate millions for an Alaska Native organization.
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Rick Perry regrets call to close Energy Department.
When he was running for president, Mr. Perry said the department should be shut down. He takes a different view, now that he has been picked to run it.
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Analysis: What it would take to really rethink capitalism.
As protectionist politicians like President-elect Donald Trump ascend to power around the world, it seems that a nameless rage has seized global politics, and millions of people are voting just to burn it all.
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<div>Warming climate may limit Lyme disease's spread in parts of the US.</div>
New study links higher temperatures with tick behavior that keeps them, and their disease-causing bacteria, away from humans.
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Trump arrives, set to assume power.
There is no doubt that Mr. Trump's cabinet picks collectively will lead an effort to undermine the legacy of Mr. Obama on the environment, health care, immigration, civil rights and education.
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