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Washington Declares Open Season On Escaped Aquaculture Salmon
State wildlife officials have asked the public to catch as many of the non-native Atlantic salmon as they can after an estimated 5,000 escaped from an aquaculture farm.
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Sub-tropical corals vulnerable, new study shows
The vulnerability and conservation value of sub-tropical reefs south of the Great Barrier Reef - regarded as climate change refuges – has been highlighted in a new study.
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<div>'Alarmingly high' levels of arsenic in Pakistan's ground water</div>
Up to 60 million Pakistanis are at risk from the deadly chemical, according to a new water analysis.
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Climate change is luring Kodiak bears away from their iconic salmon streams
Kodiak brown bears are abandoning salmon–their iconic prey–due to climate change, according to a new study.  
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Warming Arctic spurs battles for riches, shipping routes.
As climate change pushes the cold and ice a little farther north each year, it is spurring talk of a gold rush for the Arctic's abundant natural resources, prized shipping routes and business opportunities in tourism and fishing.
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<div>Does 'sustainability' help the environment or just agriculture's public image?</div>
Big food companies like Walmart want farmers to reduce greenhouse emissions from nitrogen fertilizer. But the best-known program to accomplish this may not be having much effect.
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<div>Arctic radar to probe 'space weather'</div>
The UK contributes to a sophisticated new radar to map the Sun's impacts on Earth's high atmosphere.
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Court rejects pipeline rubber-stamp, orders climate impact review.
The ruling on the Southeast Market Pipelines Project is the second federal court decision this month to conclude climate impacts must be taken into account.
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Harvard study finds Exxon misled public about climate change.
An analysis of Exxon’s research and public statements shows a sharp contrast between what the oil giant knew about climate change and what it told the public.
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<div>In Italy's drought-hit vineyards, the harvest of a changing climate.</div>
In vino veritas. The warming temperatures, shortening of the seasons and unseasonal storms brought on by global climate change are hastening the harvest of perhaps the most venerable crop of Western civilization.
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PODCAST: Tinker tailor climate spy.
Climate change threatens national security in a number of ways. How does the national intelligence community fit into the climate security picture?
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The Battle Over Oil And Gas Development In Colorado
A deadly home explosion in Colorado is renewing fights over how close oil and gas development should be to expanding suburbs. One town is trying to figure out for itself how close is too close.
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Los Angeles Tests Whether Lighter Color Streets Will Lower The Temperature
Los Angeles is piloting a project called "Cool Pavement." The city is putting a light grey coating on top of some neighborhood streets in an effort to lower the air temperature.
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Pollution Buildup At Conowingo Dam May Harm Chesapeake Bay Cleanup
A Maryland dam has been helping to clean up the Chesapeake Bay by holding back sediment that can harm aquatic life. But now the dam's sediment pools have filled up earlier than projected.
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<div>Dakota Access Pipeline Owner Sues Greenpeace For 'Criminal Activity'</div>
Energy Transfer Partners alleges Greenpeace and other "eco-terrorist groups" tried to block its pipeline with "campaigns of misinformation." Greenpeace says the suit is a bid to "silence free speech."
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Scientists Hope To Farm The Biofuel Of The Future In The Pacific Ocean
International research labs are using seaweed to make biofuel, but little progress has been made in the U.S. Now scientists in California are developing a prototype to enable vast open-ocean farming.
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Plants Under Heat Stress Must Act Surprisingly Quickly to Survive
In new results reported in The Plant Cell, molecular biologist Elizabeth Vierling at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and colleagues in India and China report finding a crucial mechanism that plants need to recover from heat stress.
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Methane Hydrate is not a Smoking Gun in the Arctic Ocean
Clathrate (hydrate) gun hypothesis stirred quite the controversy when it was posed in 2003. It stated that methane hydrates – frozen water cages containing methane gas found below the ocean floor – can melt due to increasing ocean temperatures.
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<div>'Hero' of Paris climate agreement dies</div>
Former Marshall Islands minister Tony De Brum, who played a key role in securing the Paris pact passes away aged 72.
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<div>'Cyborg' bacteria deliver green fuel source from sunlight</div>
Scientists create bacteria covered in tiny solar panels that generate a potential new fuel from the Sun.
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When is the next solar eclipse near you?
Find out when you can next witness a solar eclipse in your country with our eclipse calculator.
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Hidden river once flowed beneath Antarctic ice
Antarctic researchers from Rice University have discovered one of nature’s supreme ironies: On Earth’s driest, coldest continent, where surface water rarely exists, flowing liquid water below the ice appears to play a pivotal role in determining the fate of Antarctic ice streams.The finding, which appears online this week in Nature Geoscience, follows a two-year analysis of sediment cores and precise seafloor maps covering 2,700 square miles of the western Ross Sea. As recently as 15,000 years ago, the area was covered by thick ice that later retreated hundreds of miles inland to its current location. The maps, which were created...
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<div>RRS Sir David Attenborough's stern on the move</div>
A section of the UK's new polar research ship will get an early taste of the sea this week.
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<div>NASA Gets a Final Look at Hurricane Gert&#39;s Rainfall</div>
Before Hurricane Gert became a post-tropical cyclone, NASA got a look at the rainfall occurring within the storm. After Gert became post-tropical NOAA’s GOES-East satellite captured an image as Gert was merging with another system.The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite provided rainfall information on Hurricane Gert on August 16, 2017 at 5:37 p.m. EDT (2137 UTC). At that time, Gert was a strong category two hurricane with maximum sustained winds of about 93.5 mph (85 knots).
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The reality of post-Olympic Rio.
The 2016 Summer Games were supposed to bring Rio and Brazil to new financial and athletic heights. What's left behind? A city and country shrouded by corruption, debt and broken promises.
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Climate threat to Tampa Bay area.
It's time to get serious and for local officials in this low-lying, coastal region to play a significant role in a debate that involves the health, security, livelihoods, property and essential infrastructure for millions in the Tampa Bay area.
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Fears rise for US climate report as Trump officials take reins.
A sweeping US government report on the state of climate-change science is nearing the finish line, but researchers who wrote it aren’t ready to relax just yet.
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A drying climate threatens Africa’s coffee, but hope remains.
Uganda is pinning its hopes on its most valuable crop, though climate change is an obstacle to overcome.
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Blistering heat wave threatens Seattle, where only a third have air-conditioning.
The National Weather Service is predicting “widespread record highs” as a heat wave engulfs the Pacific Northwest.
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<div>Scientists investigate the bug destroying Canada's forest products.</div>
Scientists are monitoring outbreaks of the spruce budworm, an insect that damages trees, in an attempt to better control its spread.
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