logo

In the News

<div>'New' wave-like cloud finally wins official recognition</div>
New edition of International Cloud Atlas includes asperitas cloud after long campaign by skywatchers.
Read more...
<div>Major shake-up suggests dinosaurs may have 'UK origin'</div>
Scientists reclassify dinosaurs, putting British fossils at the base of their family tree.
Read more...
Congress Rolls Back Obama-Era Rule On Hunting Bears And Wolves In Alaska
The Senate voted Tuesday to lift a 2016 ban on certain hunting practices — like trapping and aerial shooting — on national wildlife refuges there. Now the bill heads to President Trump to be signed.
Read more...
Why More Farmers Are Making The Switch To Grass-Fed Meat And Dairy
Advocates of grass-grazing cattle say it's better for the environment and the animals. But there's another upside: Grass-fed meat and dairy fetch a premium that can help small farms stay viable.
Read more...
UK schoolboy corrects Nasa data error
The A-level student noticed something odd in radiation levels from the International Space Station.
Read more...
Plans for coal-fired power plants drop by almost half in 2016
A report suggests a "dramatic" decline in the number of coal-fired power plants in pre-construction.
Read more...
Researchers Test Hotter, Faster And Cleaner Way To Fight Oil Spills
The Flame Refluxer is essentially a big copper blanket: think Brillo pad of wool sandwiched between mesh. Using it while burning off oil yields less air pollution and residue that harms marine life.
Read more...
Fossil named after Sir David Attenborough
The ancient arthropod, found in Herefordshire, joins a long list of items named after the TV legend.
Read more...
Sea otters ahead of dolphins in using tools
Sea otters may have been using stone tools for thousands or even millions of years, say scientists.
Read more...
The foundation of aquatic life can rapidly adapt to global warming, new research suggests
Important microscopic creatures which produce half of the oxygen in the atmosphere can rapidly adapt to global warming, new research suggests.Phytoplankton, which also act as an essential food supply for fish, can increase the rate at which they take in carbon dioxide and release oxygen while in warmer water temperatures, a long-running experiment shows.Monitoring of one species, a green algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, after ten years of them being in waters of a higher temperature shows they quickly adapt so they are still able to photosynthesise more than they respire.
Read more...
2017 U.S. Wildfire Season Off to an Intense Start
Wildfires have consumed more than 2 million acres of U.S. land so far this year, nearly 10 times the long-term average and a punishing start to this year’s wildfire season, according to data from the National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC).
Read more...
Carnegie Mellon University Launches Carbon Emissions Index
Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems (MHPS) and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) today announced the creation of a new index that will measure carbon dioxide emissions from the U.S. electrical power generation sector. The Carnegie Mellon Power Sector Carbon Index will track the environmental performance of U.S. power producers and compare current emissions to historical data collected nationwide for more than two decades. A quarterly press release will inform interested parties of power sector carbon emissions performance trends.  In addition, CMU will provide an online resource for a wide variety of power sector emissions data and forecasts.
Read more...
<div>Boulder scientist teams on study probing implications of ice sheet&#39;s demise</div>
Flying over the remote during research at the Barnes Ice Cap on Baffin Island in 2009, a Boulder scientist saw dark where there should have been white.Closer inspection revealed that what Gifford Miller spotted was the remnants of a 1963 geological camp that had been buried for decades by snow and ice. Long-abandoned tents and snowmobiles were being unveiled by melting of the ice cap, and that helped inspire a study that suggests a disturbing climate change signal.
Read more...
Spring Outlook: Risk of major flooding in North Dakota, moderate flooding in Idaho
Northern North Dakota – the Souris River, Devils Lake and the northernmost reaches of the Red River – has the greatest risk of major flooding this spring, while moderate flooding is possible over southern Idaho in the Snake River basin, according to NOAA’s Spring Outlook released today.
Read more...
Dead Zones May Threaten Coral Reefs Worldwide
Dead zones affect dozens of coral reefs around the world and threaten hundreds more according to a new study by Smithsonian scientists published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Watching a massive coral reef die-off on the Caribbean coast of Panama, they suspected it was caused by a dead zone—a low-oxygen area that snuffs out marine life—rather than by ocean warming or acidification.
Read more...
<div>Indonesia's Peat Fires Still Blaze, But Not As Much As They Used To</div>
Clearing peat land by fire is illegal but remains widespread, since it's the cheapest way to clear land for farming and industry. Still, peat fires were down by more than 80 percent from 2015 to 2016.
Read more...
<div>'That food saved my life,' and Trump wants to cut it off.</div>
Famine looms for 20 million people, yet the president would rather use money for a big wall and a military buildup.
Read more...
Climate Change As An Issue Of National Security
Defense Secretary James Mattis called climate change a national security threat. Retired Brig. Gen. Gerald Galloway talks about how the Pentagon will manage challenges presented by climate change.
Read more...
Norwegian Pension Fund Divests From Companies Behind DAPL
KLP is pulling millions of dollars it has invested in companies building and owning the Dakota Access Pipeline. The decision was reportedly driven by pressure from Norway's indigenous Sami peoples.
Read more...
<div>At the Women's March, a call for climate protection, too.</div>
Amid a sea of signs and pink hats, plenty of people also marched for environment and climate science.
Read more...
Alaska Natives to protect land for California carbon program.
An undeveloped Alaska coal field, California's offsets for carbon pollution and thousands of acres of forest are the unlikely players in a complex agreement that is expected to generate millions for an Alaska Native organization.
Read more...
Rick Perry regrets call to close Energy Department.
When he was running for president, Mr. Perry said the department should be shut down. He takes a different view, now that he has been picked to run it.
Read more...
Analysis: What it would take to really rethink capitalism.
As protectionist politicians like President-elect Donald Trump ascend to power around the world, it seems that a nameless rage has seized global politics, and millions of people are voting just to burn it all.
Read more...
Trump arrives, set to assume power.
There is no doubt that Mr. Trump's cabinet picks collectively will lead an effort to undermine the legacy of Mr. Obama on the environment, health care, immigration, civil rights and education.
Read more...