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<div>Mt Hope installed as 'UK's highest peak'</div>
Scientists re-measure the tallest mountains in the Antarctic territory claimed by Britain.
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How 311 Helped Understand Air Pollution After Harvey
NPR has obtained recordings of calls made by Houston residents fearful about putrid odors in the hours and days after Hurricane Harvey started flooding the city's petrochemical infrastructure.
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Botanical exploits: How British plant hunters served science
Collecting in the clouds: Remembering the British plant-hunters who diced with death to discover plants
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<div>Recycling Chaos In U.S. As China Bans 'Foreign Waste'</div>
The U.S. ships a big chunk of its recycled goods to China. But China doesn't want them anymore, and that's leaving the recycling industry in turmoil.
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Thoroughbred Horses Killed In California Wildfire
NPR'S Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Dan Dunham, trainer at the San Luis Rey Downs Training Center. Several thoroughbred horses were killed there, caught in a California wildfire.
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Hundreds Of Thousands Flee California Wildfires
The fires in Southern California have forced many residents to evacuate multiple times within just a few days. That's leading to confusion about where to head next.
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Can Your Ceramic Cookware Give You Lead Poisoning?
Mass-produced crockpots and other ceramic food containers are probably safe, but handmade earthenware might merit a home test.
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Is The Tide Of Antibiotic Use On Farms Now Turning?
For the first time, government statistics show America's pigs, cattle, and poultry are getting fewer antibiotic drugs. Public health advocates call the new figures encouraging.
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Narwhal escape: Whales freeze and flee when frightened
Narwhals show a "costly" response to threats, raising concerns over how they will respond to increased human contact.
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US firm picks UK for weather satellites
Orbital Micro Systems' demonstration weather satellite should pave the way for a network in the sky.
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Transportation Replaces Power in U.S. as Top Source of CO2 Emissions
Power plants have been the biggest source of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States for more than 40 years. But according to new data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration, transportation has now claimed the top spot.
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New screening technique will allow crop breeders to develop drought resistant varieties faster
Chithra Karunakaran and Karen Tanino’s team developed a simple non-destructive method to screen hundreds of wheat leaf samples in a day, reducing the time and cost associated with traditional breeding programs to select varieties for drought tolerance. Their findings were published in the November issue of Physiologia Plantarum.“Developing these types of tools better enables physiologists to complement breeding programs,” said Tanino, a professor of plant sciences at the University of Saskatchewan.
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<div>Researchers find 'oldest ever eye' in fossil</div>
The remains of the extinct sea creature include an early form of the eye seen in many of today's animals.
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Quantifying the Greenhouse Gas Footprint of Crop Cultivation
"Climate-smart” crop cultivation, characterized by a low greenhouse gas (GHG) footprint, low synthetic nitrogen consumption, and simultaneously high yields (Figure 1), is an approach in agriculture for implementing the Paris Agreement as part of mitigating climate change. The GHG footprint is an index used to indicate the climate change impact potential exerted by crop production. It is therefore crucial to accurately quantify the GHG footprints of crop cultivation systems. However, severe problems or drawbacks in the quantification of GHG footprints still exist, which has limited the applicability of the GHG footprint in crop cultivation.
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Farthest monster black hole found
Astronomers discover the most distant "supermassive" black hole known to science.
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<div>Clean Energy: Experts Outline How Governments Can Successfully Invest Before It&#39;s Too Late</div>
Governments need to give technical experts more autonomy and hold their nerve to provide more long-term stability when investing in clean energy, argue researchers in climate change and innovation policy in a new paper published today.
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Researchers Model Optimal Amount of Rainfall for Plants
Researchers have determined what could be considered a “Goldilocks” climate for rainfall use by plants: not too wet and not too dry. 
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Freezing trees, finding answers
Researchers study impact of ice storms, climate change
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Could a rogue nation alter clouds to combat warming?
Plans for two experiments to potentially slow global warming by deploying tiny particles into the atmosphere have sparked an international debate over whether such tests should be allowed without some form of government scrutiny.
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Canada, U.K. team up in push to end coal-power use.
The two countries will launch an international alliance to phase out coal-fired electricity, signaling a sharp contrast to Donald Trump’s promotion of coal as an important global energy source.
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<div>Carbon emissions had leveled off. Now they're rising again.</div>
There are many reasons, but the biggest is that China is burning more coal again.
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The allure and perils of hydropower.
Damming rivers may seem like a clean and easy solution for Albania and other energy-hungry countries. But the devil is in the details.
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Can the Chesapeake area residents survive climate change?
As the world gets hotter and sea levels rise, one American island is fighting to stay alive.
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China is building 30 “sponge cities” to soften the blow of climate change.
Flooding in China continues to take lives and destroy towns. Climate change is causing this issue to worsen, so the government is supporting innovators to create sponge cities that rapidly and safely absorb water.
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